Mutual Fund Taxes

Investors who know not to put all their eggs in one basket, know about the benefits of the collective investment, or mutual funds. Mutual funds are an easy type of investment strategy where individuals can quickly diversify their financial investments by purchasing mutual funds. That is because mutual funds are actually made up of a variety of stocks, bonds, and other securities. An additional perk of the mutual fund is the special nature of its taxes.

Mutual funds have special tax features enabling investors to take advantage of many of the same tax benefits if they owned the stock privately. Mutual fund taxes are a bit complicated, and mutual fund dividends get even more confusing.

The confusion associated with mutual fund taxes is that it can produce dividends in a variety of ways and each one is taxed differently. Some mutual funds may be heavily vested in stocks and other securities so when they are later sold they might have capital gains, which then is taxed. If it is a long-term capital gain mutual fund individuals may benefit from a lower tax rate than if the money was earned through regular income.

Another possible mutual fund tax break can come from the guise of qualified dividends. They too are taxed at a lower rate than regular income and investors may get those dividends directly. If a mutual fund is tied in government bonds, the tax on that mutual fund would also be different.

Generally speaking there are many mutual fund tax incentive possibilities based on the type of investments purchased. Those wanting to diversify their portfolio into mutual funds should carefully read the prospectus on the investment so they can get a feel for the possible tax benefits. Consulting your financial advisor would also be a good way to verify the mutual fund tax information.