Google Employees Unhappy About Pay Push Execs for Answers

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Following Google’s annual employee survey — the “Googlegeist” — which revealed workers’ increasing dissatisfaction with their compensation, the company’s executives are facing mounting criticism.

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CNBC reports that at an all-hands meetings earlier this month and following the survey’s results, Google CEO Sundar Pichai and other senior executives addressed the issue. “Compensation-related questions showed the biggest decrease from last year, what is your understanding of why that is?” Pichai read aloud from one of the employee-submitted questions, according to CNBC.

Indeed, as GOBankingRates previously reported, the survey showed that only 46% of the respondents said their total compensation is competitive compared to similar jobs at other companies, down 12 points from a year earlier. In addition, 56%, said their pay is “fair and equitable,” a drop of eight points from the prior year, while 64% of employees said their performance is reflected in their pay, down three points.

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At the meeting, Bret Hill — Google’s vice president of “Total Rewards,” which refers to compensation and stock packages — said, “There’s some macro economic trends at play. It’s a very competitive market and you’re probably hearing anecdotal stories of colleagues getting better offers at other companies,” according to CNBC.

A Google spokesperson said employees are well paid and that the company values feedback.

“We know that our employees have many choices about where they work, so we ensure they are very well compensated,” the spokesperson said in a statement to CNBC. “That’s why we’ve always provided top of market compensation across salary, equity, leave, and a suite of benefits.”

Google asked its employees to return to the office on April 4, 2022 and outlined a hybrid work model where most workers will be required to be in the office three days a week, The Wall Street Journal reported.

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“Our hybrid model balances the best of being together in person and being anywhere — where teams can intentionally come together to collaborate and connect in the office, and spend the other days working from wherever best suits their needs,” John Casey, vice president of global benefits at Google, wrote to employees, according to the WSJ.

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In addition to addressing compensation questions, Google execs reportedly admitted they are working on “systematic fixes” to its performance review process, as well.

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About the Author

Yaël Bizouati-Kennedy is a full-time financial journalist and has written for several publications, including Dow Jones, The Financial Times Group, Bloomberg and Business Insider. She also worked as a vice president/senior content writer for major NYC-based financial companies, including New York Life and MSCI. Yaël is now freelancing and most recently, she co-authored  the book “Blockchain for Medical Research: Accelerating Trust in Healthcare,” with Dr. Sean Manion. (CRC Press, April 2020) She holds two master’s degrees, including one in Journalism from New York University and one in Russian Studies from Université Toulouse-Jean Jaurès, France.
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