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Jobs That Only Exist in Hollywood

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Andrew Zarivny / Shutterstock.com

Show business is a world of make-believe designed to entertain audiences. Of course, bringing scripts to life isn’t an easy task. It takes a village of specially-trained professionals to create beloved movies and television shows.

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High-profile roles like actor, producer and director are what most people consider working in Hollywood, but they’re just a small portion of the on-set talent. If you sit through the credits of any production, you’ll see dozens — or even hundreds — of names alongside mysterious jobs you didn’t know existed.

In fact, many of these jobs aren’t a thing outside of Hollywood. The entertainment industry is a unique field that requires its own village of talent. Professionals are able to put their very distinct skills to work to bring the magic of Hollywood to life.

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If you’re interested in going to Hollywood, there are more directions to take your career than you might realize. Here’s a look at five jobs you won’t find anywhere else.

Last updated: March 2, 2021

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COVID-19 Compliance Supervisor

New in 2020, the COVID-19 compliance supervisor role was created as part of the agreement between entertainment unions and an alliance of producers for production to resume, according to the Los Angeles Times. All producers are currently required to hire a supervisor, who handles the compliance and enforcement of industry COVID-19 protocols on set.

Specific responsibilities associated with the job include sanitation, testing, safety equipment and enforcing social distancing measures. Salaries for this newly created position vary, but can range from around $500 to $1,000 per day, according to the Los Angeles Times.

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Second Assistant Camera Operator

Also known as a clapper loader, the second assistant camera operator is tasked with loading and unloading raw film stock into camera magazines at the beginning of each take. This is a huge responsibility because they’re typically the only person with direct access to the undeveloped negative. If the film is handled improperly on the way to the lab, its contents are useless.

Some of the other tasks associated with the job include marking actors as needed and handling all recordkeeping and paperwork for the camera department. Salaries for a second assistant camera operator range from approximately $42,000 to $62,000, according to CareersinFilm.com.

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Intimacy Coordinator

A job largely made popular by the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements, an intimacy coordinator helps orchestrate scenes involving sex or nudity, ensuring actors feel comfortable. This is important because actors were previously often left to handle specifics of intimate scenes on their own, which set the stage for misinterpretations and crossed boundaries.

In addition to checking in with actors to make sure they don’t feel exploited, intimacy coordinators also work with the costume department to create barriers that make these scenes safer for all participants. Specific salaries aren’t publicly available, but could average six figures, according to NBC News.

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Picture Car Coordinator

A picture car coordinator finds and modifies vehicles to fit production needs. These experts ensure cars are kept in good shape, and are responsible for everything from performing repairs to making safe modifications so cars can perform stunts. In fact, they’re in constant contact with drivers — i.e., actors and stunt doubles — while filming, giving step-by-step instructions.

Picture car coordinators also typically serve as consultants, offering expert advice on the types of cars to fit the genre of movies and television shows. Specific salary information is not available.

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Script Supervisor

Sets are busy places, so the script supervisor is tasked with maintaining order as it relates to production — i.e., ensuring an actor’s hairstyle is the same from one scene to the next. These professionals keep the set organized, ensuring actors and props are in their proper positions before the camera starts rolling.

They also take meticulous notes during filming, making it easier for the editor and director to piece together scenes in post-production. The average annual salary of a script supervisor is $67,055, but can range from $19,500 to $129,500, according to ZipRecruiter.

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