GOBankingRates

Do You Make Enough to Put Your Kid Through College?

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Americans have been taking on more and more debt to keep up with the rising cost of college. According to the latest figures from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Americans owe $1.34 trillion in student loan debt. How much would you have to earn to avoid the college debt trap? Could you live comfortably while doing so?

To find out this magical number for all 50 states, GOBankingRates surveyed college costs and the amount needed to live comfortably. We used College Board data on the average price of in-state tuition and fees at public four-year institutions. Then, we calculated the cost of living in each state by identifying the dollar amounts required to cover the following necessities for a year: a mortgage, groceries, utilities (electricity), transportation and healthcare. We also calculated what residents would spend on splurges and savings using the 50-30-20 budgeting rule, in which 50 percent of income covers necessities, 30 percent covers discretionary items and 20 percent is for savings.

By combining all these figures, GOBankingRates identified the income needed to live comfortably in each state and send a child to college without taking out loans. Click through to find out how much you need to make each year in your state.

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In Alabama, You’d Need to Earn: $71,370

  • Average college tuition and fees: $10,040
  • Annual necessities: $30,665
  • Annual splurges: $18,399
  • Annual savings: $12,266

Alabama falls within the bottom half of states for income needed to pay for college. That’s because necessities cost less here than in most states. However, college costs aren’t near the bottom. The average in-state tuition and fees for the 2016-17 school year were $10,040 at four-year public schools in Alabama. Also, the state’s median household income of $44,509 falls $26,860 short of the income necessary to send a kid to college and live comfortably.

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In Alaska, You’d Need to Earn: $83,154

  • Average college tuition and fees: $7,130
  • Annual necessities: $38,012
  • Annual splurges: $22,807
  • Annual savings: $15,205

The average college tuition and fees of $7,130 at Alaska state schools is lower than in most states. However, residents of the largest state need a higher annual income to put a kid through college than residents of the majority of states because the cost of living in Alaska is high. Fortunately, the median household income is also high — $75,112 — but it still falls about $8,000 short of being enough to cover college costs and live comfortably.

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In Arizona, You’d Need to Earn: $79,226

  • Average college tuition and fees: $10,960
  • Annual necessities: $34,133
  • Annual splurges: $20,480
  • Annual savings: $13,653

Arizona residents will likely have to borrow money to send their kids to a state university unless they stash cash in a 529 college savings plan. With average in-state tuition and fees of $10,960, Arizona families need more than $79,000 in annual income to cover college costs in addition to necessities and other expenses. However, the median household income in the state is just $52,248.

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In Arkansas, You’d Need to Earn: $62,596

  • Average college tuition and fees: $8,250
  • Annual necessities: $27,173
  • Annual splurges: $16,304
  • Annual savings: $10,869

Thanks to a low cost of living and relatively low tuition and fees for state schools, the annual income needed for Arkansas residents to send their kids to an in-state college is the second-lowest on our list.

However, families still could end up with student loan debt because the median household income isn’t enough to cover college costs and household expenses. Arkansas has a median household income of just $42,798.

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In California, You’d Need to Earn: $106,770

  • Average college tuition and fees: $9,350
  • Annual necessities: $48,710
  • Annual splurges: $29,226
  • Annual savings: $19,484

If you’re a California resident, you’ll likely need to increase your annual income to pay for college costs and live comfortably. The average in-state tuition of $9,350 for a four-year public institution in California is lower than nearly half of the states. However, residents need a bigger income to have enough for tuition after covering California’s high cost of living.

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In Colorado, You’d Need to Earn: $91,700

  • Average college tuition and fees: $10,260
  • Annual necessities: $40,720
  • Annual splurges: $24,432
  • Annual savings: $16,288

Colorado residents need a higher annual income to pay for college and live comfortably than residents in all but three states because of the high cost of necessities and other expenses. Plus, the average in-state tuition and fees of $10,260 are higher than in-state college costs in more than half of the states. With a median household income of $66,596, Colorado families might have to rely on student loans.

Find Out: How to Pay for College Without Student Loans

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In Connecticut, You’d Need to Earn: $91,140

  • Average college tuition and fees: $11,730
  • Annual necessities: $39,705
  • Annual splurges: $23,823
  • Annual savings: $15,882

The annual income needed for in-state college costs in Connecticut is higher than in most states. That’s because the cost of living is relatively high, as are in-state tuition and fees. Even Connecticut’s high median household income of $72,889 isn’t enough to cover in-state college costs, necessities, splurges and savings.

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In Delaware, You’d Need to Earn: $81,084

  • Average college tuition and fees: $11,930
  • Annual necessities: $34,577
  • Annual splurges: $20,746
  • Annual savings: $13,831

Delaware’s average in-state tuition and fees of $11,930 are among the highest in the U.S. Combined with a cost of living that’s slightly higher than the national average, a relatively high annual income is needed to put a kid through college in Delaware and live comfortably. However, the state’s median household income of $57,756 is $23,000 less than what’s needed.

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In Florida, You’d Need to Earn: $79,112

  • Average college tuition and fees: $6,360
  • Annual necessities: $36,376
  • Annual splurges: $21,826
  • Annual savings: $14,550

Florida might be one of the best states to retire rich in, but it might not be one of the best to live comfortably and send your kid to college.

Florida’s in-state tuition and fees are the second lowest in the U.S. However, the annual income needed to pay for college and live comfortably is higher here than in more than half of the states because the cost of necessities is high. And, the median household income of $48,825 isn’t nearly enough to pay for college and other expenses.

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In Georgia, You’d Need to Earn: $72,414

  • Average college tuition and fees: $8,450
  • Annual necessities: $31,982
  • Annual splurges: $19,189
  • Annual savings: $12,793

Thanks to a low cost of living and relatively low in-state tuition and fees, Georgia families don’t need as high of an annual income for college costs as residents in more than half of the states. However, Georgia’s median household income $50,768 isn’t enough to pay for college and other expenses — which might explain why the average student loan debt in Georgia is high.

Also See: The Average Student Loan Debt in Every State

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In Hawaii, You’d Need to Earn: $126,454

  • Average college tuition and fees: $10,670
  • Annual necessities: $57,892
  • Annual splurges: $34,735
  • Annual savings: $23,157

Hawaii requires the highest annual income to pay for in-state college costs and live comfortably. At $10,670, the average in-state tuition and fees are by no means the highest in the nation. However, the cost of necessities is higher here than in any other state, which means residents need bigger paychecks to cover Hawaii’s cost of living and college costs. Considering that the median household income is $64,514, families in Hawaii might need to borrow money if they don’t have a college fund to help pay for tuition.

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In Idaho, You’d Need to Earn: $70,292

  • Average college tuition and fees: $7,010
  • Annual necessities: $31,641
  • Annual splurges: $18,985
  • Annual savings: $12,656

The average in-state tuition and fees of $7,010 for Idaho public institutions is among the lowest in the U.S. Plus, the cost of necessities is relatively low. As a result, the annual income needed in Idaho to pay for in-state college costs and live comfortably is lower than in the majority of states.

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In Illinois, You’d Need to Earn: $72,174

  • Average college tuition and fees: $13,280
  • Annual necessities: $29,447
  • Annual splurges: $17,668
  • Annual savings: $11,779

At $13,280, Illinois has the fifth-highest average of in-state college costs. However, the average cost of necessities is relatively low. As a result, the annual income needed in Illinois to pay for college and live comfortably is lower than half of the states. Families might be able to pay for college without racking up debt.

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In Indiana, You’d Need to Earn: $62,091

  • Average college tuition and fees: $9,200
  • Annual necessities: $26,446
  • Annual splurges: $15,867
  • Annual savings: $10,578

The annual income needed in Indiana to pay for college and live comfortably is lower than in any other state. That’s because the average cost of necessities is lower here than in every state except Ohio. However, in-state college tuition and fees are lower in Indiana than in Ohio: $9,200 versus $10,270.

Nonetheless, there’s about a $10,000 gap between the state’s median household income of $51,983 and the annual income needed for in-state college costs.

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In Iowa, You’d Need to Earn: $65,077

  • Average college tuition and fees: $8,270
  • Annual necessities: $28,405
  • Annual splurges: $17,042
  • Annual savings: $11,361

Iowa falls near the bottom of states for income needed to pay for college and live comfortably thanks to a low cost of living. Plus, the average in-state tuition and fees are a low $8,270. As a result, the gap between the income necessary to cover college and household costs and Iowa’s median household income of $60,855 is small.

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In Kansas, You’d Need to Earn: $64,937

  • Average college tuition and fees: $8,920
  • Annual necessities: $28,009
  • Annual splurges: $16,805
  • Annual savings: $11,203

Although the annual income needed to send a kid to college in Kansas and live comfortably is lower than in most states, families still might find it difficult to pay for school without student loans. That’s because the median household income of $54,865 is about $10,000 short of being enough to cover in-state college costs, living expenses and savings in Kansas.

Check Out: The Most Expensive Colleges in Every State

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In Kentucky, You’d Need to Earn: $64,110

  • Average college tuition and fees: $9,950
  • Annual necessities: $27,080
  • Annual splurges: $16,248
  • Annual savings: $10,832

The annual income needed to cover in-state college costs and a comfortable life in Kentucky is lower than in all but four states because of a low cost of living and relatively low in-state tuition and fees of $9,950. However, the state’s median household income of $42,387 is $21,723 less than the income need to pay for college and other household expenses.

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In Louisiana, You’d Need to Earn: $72,372

  • Average college tuition and fees: $8,900
  • Annual necessities: $31,736
  • Annual splurges: $19,042
  • Annual savings: $12,694

Louisiana ranks among the bottom half of states for annual income needed to pay for college and live comfortably thanks to relatively low expenses and in-state tuition and fees of just $8,900. However, the median household income of $45,922 doesn’t come close to being enough to pay for college costs in addition to living expenses and savings.

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In Maine, You’d Need to Earn: $72,543

  • Average college tuition and fees: $9,690
  • Annual necessities: $31,426
  • Annual splurges: $18,856
  • Annual savings: $12,571

Maine residents need less to pay for college and live comfortably than residents in more than half of the states thanks to a relatively low average in-state tuition of $9,690. Plus, the average cost of necessities here is lower than in more than half of the states. Yet, there’s still at $21,786 gap between the income needed to pay for college and the state’s median household income of $50,756.

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In Maryland, You’d Need to Earn: $87,000

  • Average college tuition and fees: $9,370
  • Annual necessities: $38,815
  • Annual splurges: $23,289
  • Annual savings: $15,526

Maryland has one of the highest median household income in the U.S. — $73,594. Still, it’s $13,406 less than the annual income needed to pay for college as well as household expenses. That’s because the average cost of necessities, combined with splurges and savings, is high.

Also See: 9 Things Parents Can Do Now So Your Kids Have More Later

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In Massachusetts, You’d Need to Earn: $96,574

  • Average college tuition and fees: $12,280
  • Annual necessities: $42,147
  • Annual splurges: $25,288
  • Annual savings: $16,859

Massachusetts requires the third-highest annual income to pay for college and live comfortably, after California and Hawaii. At $12,280, in-state tuition and fees are among the highest. Plus, the high cost of living here makes Massachusetts one of the states where residents are most likely to live paycheck to paycheck.

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In Michigan, You’d Need to Earn: $67,249

  • Average college tuition and fees: $12,460
  • Annual necessities: $27,394
  • Annual splurges: $16,437
  • Annual savings: $10,958

Michigan’s average in-state tuition of $12,460 is higher than in most states. However, the annual income needed to pay for college and live comfortably isn’t near the top of the list because the cost of living is relatively low. Nonetheless, it’s $13,045 more than the median household income of $54,203.

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In Minnesota, You’d Need to Earn: $78,430

  • Average college tuition and fees: $10,950
  • Annual necessities: $33,740
  • Annual splurges: $20,244
  • Annual savings: $13,496

The annual income needed to pay for college is higher in Minnesota than in 31 other states. Residents need more to cover in-state tuition and fees of $10,950 and relatively high household costs. The median household income of $68,730 falls about $10,000 short of the income needed to live comfortably and send a child to college.

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In Mississippi, You’d Need to Earn: $65,636

  • Average college tuition and fees: $7,410
  • Annual necessities: $29,113
  • Annual splurges: $17,468
  • Annual savings: $11,645

The annual income needed to pay for college in Mississippi and live comfortably is one of the lowest on our list. However, the state’s median household income of $40,037 is the lowest in the U.S. Even though in-state tuition is a low $7,410, there’s a $25,598 gap between the income needed to pay for college and the median income in Mississippi. After those four years are up, graduates and their parents should refer to these helpful tips to pay off student loans.

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In Missouri, You’d Need to Earn: $63,618

  • Average college tuition and fees: $8,630
  • Annual necessities: $27,494
  • Annual splurges: $16,496
  • Annual savings: $10,998

The annual income needed to pay for college and live comfortably in Missouri is among the lowest on our list. That’s because the cost of living and in-state tuition of $8,630 are low. Plus, with the state’s median household income at $59,196 the gap between it and what you need for college and expenses isn’t too large, at just $4,422.

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In Montana, You’d Need to Earn: $77,633

  • Average college tuition and fees: $6,410
  • Annual necessities: $35,611
  • Annual splurges: $21,367
  • Annual savings: $14,245

Despite low in-state tuition and fees of $6,410, Montana ranks among the top half of states for income needed to pay for college and live comfortably. That’s because residents need more to cover necessities, splurges and savings. As a result, the state’s median household income of $51,395 is $26,237 less than the income needed to live comfortably and cover college costs.

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In Nebraska, You’d Need to Earn: $67,866

  • Average college tuition and fees: $7,880
  • Annual necessities: $29,993
  • Annual splurges: $17,996
  • Annual savings: $11,997

The median household income in Nebraska — $60,474 — is close to the annual income needed to pay for college and live comfortably. Although the average in-state tuition is a low $7,880 and living costs are relatively low, there’s still more than a $7,000 gap between the median income and the amount needed to send a kid to college and live comfortably in Nebraska.

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In Nevada, You’d Need to Earn: $75,100

  • Average college tuition and fees: $6,910
  • Annual necessities: $34,095
  • Annual splurges: $20,457
  • Annual savings: $13,638

Nevada’s average in-state tuition and fees of $6,910 are lower than public college costs in all but five states. However, the annual cost of necessities, splurges and savings run higher than most states. As a result, the state’s median household income of $52,008 isn’t enough to live comfortably and pay for college.

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In New Hampshire, You’d Need to Earn: $87,334

  • Average college tuition and fees: $15,650
  • Annual necessities: $35,842
  • Annual splurges: $21,505
  • Annual savings: $14,337

New Hampshire ranks among the top 10 states for the annual income needed to pay for college and live comfortably. The cost of living is relatively high. But the big reason residents need a higher income to send their kids to school is because New Hampshire has the highest in-state tuition and fees for public institutions — $15,650. Although tuition seems high when compared to the rest of the country, see how it compares to the most affordable overseas colleges.

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In New Jersey, You’d Need to Earn: $86,820

  • Average college tuition and fees: $13,560
  • Annual necessities: $36,630
  • Annual splurges: $21,978
  • Annual savings: $14,652

New Jersey also falls among the top 10 states for annual income needed to send a child to college and live comfortably. That’s because the cost of living and the in-state tuition of $13,560 are high. Although the state’s median household income of $68,357 is also high, it’s $18,462 less than the income necessary to live comfortably and pay for college.

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In New Mexico, You’d Need to Earn: $69,194

  • Average college tuition and fees: $6,620
  • Annual necessities: $31,287
  • Annual splurges: $18,772
  • Annual savings: $12,515

New Mexico’s in-state tuition of $6,620 is among the lowest in the nation. However, the median household income is a low $45,119. So, there’s a $24,075 gap between the median income and the income needed to live comfortably while paying for college.

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In New York, You’d Need to Earn: $88,476

  • Average college tuition and fees: $7,710
  • Annual necessities: $40,383
  • Annual splurges: $24,230
  • Annual savings: $16,153

New York’s average in-state tuition and fees of $7,710 are relatively low. However, the average annual cost of necessities is higher than in all but a few states, which is why residents need such a high income to live comfortably and afford college. Unfortunately, the median household income of $58,005 falls short by more than $30,000. To survive New York’s high costs, parents and students could benefit from learning the best budgeting tips for college students.

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In North Carolina, You’d Need to Earn: $71,522

  • Average college tuition and fees: $7,200
  • Annual necessities: $32,161
  • Annual splurges: $19,297
  • Annual savings: $12,864

The average in-state tuition and fees for North Carolina public institutions are relatively low. As a result, the annual income needed to pay for college and live comfortably is lower in North Carolina than a majority of the states. However, the state’s median household income of $50,797 is $20,725 less than the income needed to live comfortably and pay for college.

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In North Dakota, You’d Need to Earn: $77,186

  • Average college tuition and fees: $7,880
  • Annual necessities: $34,653
  • Annual splurges: $20,792
  • Annual savings: $13,861

North Dakota’s average in-state tuition and fees of $7,880 are relatively low. So it’s the cost of necessities, splurges and savings that push up the income needed to live comfortably and pay for college in this state. That amount is nearly $20,000 more than the median household income of $57,415.

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In Ohio, You’d Need to Earn: $62,931

  • Average college tuition and fees: $10,270
  • Annual necessities: $26,331
  • Annual splurges: $15,798
  • Annual savings: $10,532

The annual income needed to pay for college in Ohio and live comfortably is lower than in all but two states. Residents have a low cost of living to thank for that. However, the state’s median household income of $53,301 is $9,630 less than the income needed to pay for college and live comfortably.

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In Oklahoma, You’d Need to Earn: $67,944

  • Average college tuition and fees: $8,030
  • Annual necessities: $29,957
  • Annual splurges: $17,974
  • Annual savings: $11,983

The cost of living in Oklahoma is low, as is in-state tuition. However, the state’s median household income of $47,077 also is low. So there’s a gap of about $20,000 between median income and the annual income needed to pay for college in Oklahoma and live comfortably.

See: How to Get Out of Paying Your Student Loans

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In Oregon, You’d Need to Earn: $85,762

  • Average college tuition and fees: $9,690
  • Annual necessities: $38,036
  • Annual splurges: $22,822
  • Annual savings: $15,214

Oregon’s median household income of $60,834 is higher than the national median. However, it falls nearly $25,000 short of the income needed to pay for in-state colleges and cover household costs. A high income is necessary because of the high cost of necessities in Oregon, as well as the cost of splurges and savings.

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In Pennsylvania, You’d Need to Earn: $73,209

  • Average college tuition and fees: $13,880
  • Annual necessities: $29,664
  • Annual splurges: $17,799
  • Annual savings: $11,866

Although the cost of necessities and other expenses are relatively low in Pennsylvania, residents have to pay high in-state tuition and fees costs for four-year public institutions. As a result, the median household income of $60,389 isn’t high enough to cover college and living costs.

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In Rhode Island, You’d Need to Earn: $82,816

  • Average college tuition and fees: $11,410
  • Annual necessities: $35,703
  • Annual splurges: $21,422
  • Annual savings: $14,281

Rhode Island’s relatively high in-state tuition of $11,410 combined with high expenses means residents need to earn more than residents in most states to have enough to put a kid through college and live comfortably. However, the state’s median household income of $55,701 is $27,114 less than the income needed.

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In South Carolina, You’d Need to Earn: $77,968

  • Average college tuition and fees: $12,190
  • Annual necessities: $32,889
  • Annual splurges: $19,733
  • Annual savings: $13,156

The state’s median household income of $46,360 doesn’t even come close to being enough to pay for college and live comfortably in South Carolina. There’s a gap of more than $31,000. Student loan debt is high in South Carolina, where the average in-state tuition and fees are $12,190. After getting their degrees, graduates should take these 10 immediate money steps.

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In South Dakota, You’d Need to Earn: $71,014

  • Average college tuition and fees: $8,140
  • Annual necessities: $31,437
  • Annual splurges: $18,862
  • Annual savings: $12,575

South Dakota falls within the bottom half of states for income needed to pay for college and live comfortably. That’s because in-state tuition and fees are just $8,140, and necessities cost less here than in many states. However, residents still might need student loans if they don’t have a college fund because there’s a large gap between the income needed to pay for college and live comfortably and the median household income of $55,065.

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In Tennessee, You’d Need to Earn: $66,544

  • Average college tuition and fees: $9,520
  • Annual necessities: $28,512
  • Annual splurges: $17,107
  • Annual savings: $11,405

It takes less income to pay for college in Tennessee and live comfortably than in most states. That’s because the cost of living is low here, and in-state tuition and fees are a low $9,520. However, the state’s low median household income of $47,330 is $19,214 less than the income needed to cover college costs and live comfortably.

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In Texas, You’d Need to Earn: $77,227

  • Average college tuition and fees: $9,570
  • Annual necessities: $33,828
  • Annual splurges: $20,297
  • Annual savings: $13,531

Not everything is bigger in Texas — at least not the income needed to pay for college and live comfortably. There are 21 states where residents have to make more money than Texans to cover household and college costs. Considering the state’s median household income is $56,473, many Texans would need to earn more money to pay for college and live comfortably.

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In Utah, You’d Need to Earn: $77,138

  • Average college tuition and fees: $6,580
  • Annual necessities: $35,279
  • Annual splurges: $21,167
  • Annual savings: $14,112

Utah’s average in-state tuition of $6,580 is among the lowest in the nation. However, the income needed to pay for college and live comfortably is higher than more than half of the states because necessities cost more. Utah does have a relatively high median household income of $66,258. But there’s still a $10,879 gap between the median income and the income needed to pay for college and live comfortably.

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In Vermont, You’d Need to Earn: $82,502

  • Average college tuition and fees: $15,450
  • Annual necessities: $33,526
  • Annual splurges: $20,116
  • Annual savings: $13,410

At $15,450, Vermont has the second highest in-state tuition and fees, after New Hampshire. As a result, Vermont ranks among the top 15 states for income needed to pay for college and live comfortably. However, the state’s median household income of $59,494 falls $23,008 short of being enough to cover college and household costs.

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In Virginia, You’d Need to Earn: $82,084

  • Average college tuition and fees: $12,320
  • Annual necessities: $34,882
  • Annual splurges: $20,929
  • Annual savings: $13,953

Virginia ranks No. 15 for income needed to pay for college and live comfortably. That’s because the cost of living and in-state tuition are relatively high. Although the state’s median household income of $61,486 is higher than the national median, it’s not enough for residents to live comfortably and send a child to college.

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In Washington, You’d Need to Earn: $84,184

  • Average college tuition and fees: $9,270
  • Annual necessities: $37,457
  • Annual splurges: $22,474
  • Annual savings: $14,983

Washington ranks No. 11 for income needed to send a kid to college and live comfortably. The average in-state tuition and fees of $9,270 aren’t high, but the cost of living is. Residents would need to earn more than the median household income of $67,243 to live comfortably and have enough to pay for in-state tuition.

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In West Virginia, You’d Need to Earn: $64,130

  • Average college tuition and fees: $7,490
  • Annual necessities: $28,320
  • Annual splurges: $16,992
  • Annual savings: $11,328

West Virginia residents need to earn less to pay for college than residents of all but five states. That’s because the cost of living is low, as is the in-state tuition. However, the median household income is also low at $42,824.

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In Wisconsin, You’d Need to Earn: $66,477

  • Average college tuition and fees: $8,930
  • Annual necessities: $28,774
  • Annual splurges: $17,264
  • Annual savings: $11,509

Wisconsin falls within the lowest 10 of states for income needed to pay for college and live comfortably. Average in-state tuition and fees are a relatively low $8,930. And the average cost of necessities is among the lowest in the nation. Still, there’s an $11,052 gap between the state’s median household income of $55,425 and the income needed to live comfortably and pay for college.

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In Wyoming, You’d Need to Earn: $70,336

  • Average college tuition and fees: $5,060
  • Annual necessities: $32,638
  • Annual splurges: $19,583
  • Annual savings: $13,055

At $5,060, Wyoming has the lowest average in-state tuition and fees of any state. However, it doesn’t rank at the very bottom of states for the income needed to pay for college and live comfortably. And, Wyoming’s median household income of $60,925 isn’t enough to cover living costs and in-state tuition.

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Methodology: GOBankingRates surveyed monthly living expenses in all 50 states. The cost-of-living comparison included the following factors: (1) median mortgage costs using Zillow’s mortgage calculation and median list price for each state, which was sourced from March 2017 data; (2) annual groceries costs, using the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center’s cost of l living index; (3) annual electricity bill, sourced from the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s 2015 average monthly bill data for every state; (4) annual vehicle ownership and usage costs, sourced from GOBankingRates’ Most and Least Expensive States to Own a Car study; and (5) annual healthcare costs, sourced from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation’s 2015 data on the average family premium per enrolled employee for employer-based health insurance. Median income amounts are according to the Census Bureau’s “Median Household Income by State: 1984-2015.”

Monthly costs were totaled and multiplied by 12 to get the annual dollar cost of necessities in each state. This dollar amount for necessities was then doubled to find the actual annual income needed to live comfortably in the city, assuming a person is following the 50-30-20 budgeting guideline, which requires an income double the cost of necessities. The amount of money specified for savings is equal to 20 percent of the total income needed, and the amount specified for discretionary spending is equal to 30 percent of the total income needed.

College tuition and fee costs at in-state public four-year institutions for 2016-2017 are sourced from the College Board.