GOBankingRates

Here’s How Much Americans Expect to Pay for Healthcare in 2016

Americans pay almost as much for healthcare each year as for housing, making it the second-biggest household expense. On average, household spending on healthcare in 2015 was $8,247, according to Bureau of Economic Analysis data, and a 2015 PwC Health Research Institute report projected a 6.5 percent increase in healthcare spending in 2016.

“Healthcare costs are on the rise again, and they’re accelerating,” said Joel White, president of the Council for Affordable Health Coverage.

One of the reasons consumers spend increasingly more on healthcare every year is rising insurance costs. Since 2000, the average annual increase in premiums for insurance plans offered through employers has been 7.3 percent, said Jon Gabel, a senior fellow at independent research institution NORC at the University of Chicago.

GOBankingRates surveyed residents of all 50 states and the District of Columbia to find out whether Americans are preparing to pay more for healthcare in the coming year. The survey asked if they expect to spend less, the same, a little more or a lot more on healthcare than they did in the last year. Click through to see what people in your state think they’ll pay for healthcare in 2016.

Read: Over 40% of Americans Expect to Pay More for Healthcare in 2016

Alabama: Same

The top response by Alabama residents who were asked how much they expect to spend on healthcare in 2016 was “same as the last year,” followed by “less than the last year.” The response is somewhat surprising considering that GOBankingRates’ 2016 health insurance cost state ranking found that Alabama has the third-highest health insurance costs in the U.S.

In the past, healthcare expenditures have actually surpassed housing costs in Alabama. In 2014 — the latest year for which figures are available — households in this state spent an average of $5,224 on healthcare versus $4,941 for housing, according to a 2015 report from the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Alaska: More

The majority of Alaska residents surveyed said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. Unfortunately, healthcare costs are already high for Alaskans.

Alaskan households spent more for healthcare than any other state in 2014 — an average of $9,303, according to the BEA report. Only residents of the District of Columbia paid more. Costs are higher in the state because of its isolation and small markets, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Arizona: More

About one-third of those surveyed in Arizona said they expect to pay the same for healthcare in 2016. But more than 40 percent said they think they will pay a little or a lot more in the next year.

Fortunately, health insurance costs are lower in Arizona than most states, landing the state in the No. 13 spot in GOBankingRates’ health insurance cost ranking. Also, the average healthcare spending per household is among the lowest in the nation, according to the BEA.

Arkansas: More

Arkansas residents surveyed said they expect to pay more for healthcare in 2016. Arkansas actually had the fifth-lowest healthcare spending per household in the nation in 2014, according to the BEA. And insurance costs there are lower than half of the states, according to GOBankingRates’ 2016 study.

Although medical costs are lower, on average, for Arkansas residents than other Americans, they consume a bigger portion of their household budget. Healthcare spending was the biggest single household expenditure in Arkansas in 2014, with residents paying an average of $5,107, according to the BEA.

California: Same

Most Californians surveyed said they expect to pay the same for healthcare in 2016. The state’s residents spend less on healthcare than residents of most other states, based on 2014 BEA figures.

Furthermore, health insurance costs in the state are among the lowest in the nation, according to GOBankingRates’ ranking. But California Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed a tax on health insurance plans, which could increase residents’ health costs.

Colorado: More

Of those surveyed in Colorado, 46 percent said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in the next year versus 34 percent who expect to pay the same and about 20 percent who expect to pay less.

Colorado falls in the bottom half of states when it comes to household spending on healthcare, according to the BEA. However, its health insurance costs are the 10th-highest in the nation, according to GOBankingRates’ 2016 health insurance cost study, which might explain why Coloradoans expect their overall health costs to be higher this year.

Connecticut: More

About half of the Connecticut residents surveyed said they expect to pay more for healthcare in 2016, followed by about one-third who expect to spend the same amount as last year. In previous years, healthcare spending in Connecticut has been higher than the national average, according to BEA data. However, insurance costs in the state are the 12th-lowest in the nation, according to GOBankingRates’ study.

Delaware: More

A majority of Delaware residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016, according to this survey. Unfortunately, it’s a state where healthcare costs already are high. Healthcare spending in Delaware was well above the national average in 2014 according to BEA data — $8,061 versus $6,128.

Perhaps residents expect to spend more on healthcare in 2016 because health insurance costs increased over the course of the last year. Premiums for plans on Delaware’s Affordable Care Act exchange increased 22 percent, on average, from 2015 to 2016, according to DelawareOnline.com.

District of Columbia: More

A slightly greater percentage of those surveyed in the nation’s capital expect to spend a little or a lot more on healthcare in 2016 than those who expect to pay the same. Unfortunately, D.C. households already shell out more for healthcare than residents of any state. The average household spending on healthcare was $11,358 in 2014, according to the BEA.

Health insurance costs in the District of Columbia are among the lowest in the nation in 2016, however. The District is in the No. 7 spot for lowest costs in GOBankingRates’ ranking.

Florida: More

Healthcare spending has been slightly below the national average in Florida, according to the BEA. But 41 percent of the state’s residents who were surveyed said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. Slightly less — 38 percent — expect to spend the same amount as last year.

High insurance costs might play a role in Florida residents’ expectations of paying more for healthcare in 2016. Premiums are higher in the Sunshine State than in more than half the other states.

Georgia: More

About half of the residents surveyed in Georgia expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. Healthcare spending in the state has been well below the national average, though. Georgia had the fourth-lowest average household spending on healthcare in the nation in 2014, according to the BEA.

Health insurance costs, on the other hand, are higher in Georgia than more than half the other states, according to GOBankingRates’ ranking.

Hawaii: More/Less

Hawaii is the only state with a tie for survey response selections of expecting to pay more and expecting to pay less for healthcare in 2016. Perhaps it’s because insurance costs in the Aloha State are among the lowest in the nation. The average healthcare spending per household has also been lower than the national average in previous years as well, according to the BEA.

Idaho: More/Same

An equal number of Idaho residents surveyed said they expect to pay the same for healthcare as they did in the last year or a little or a lot more for healthcare this year. The state ranks in the bottom of the nation for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to a 2015 study by the Commonwealth Fund. In fact, the percentage of adults under 65 with high out-of-pocket medical costs relative to their income was greater in 2013 and 2014 than in any other state except Tennessee.

Illinois: More

Nearly half the Illinois residents surveyed expect to spend a little or a lot more on healthcare in 2016. In previous years, healthcare expenditures in the state have been close to the national average, with households spending an average of $6,246 in 2014, according to the BEA.

Illinois ranks in the top half of states for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund study. And its health insurance costs are the 15th-lowest in the nation, according to GOBankingRates’ ranking.

Indiana: More

Indiana residents were more likely to report that they expect to spend a little or a lot more on healthcare in 2016. In the past, healthcare spending in the state has been about on par with the national average, with households spending an average of $6,277 in 2014, according to the BEA. However, it has some of the highest health insurance costs in the nation, found GOBankingRates’ study.

Read: 7 Ways to Improve Your Health and Finances

Iowa: Same

This survey found that Iowa residents were more likely to expect to pay the same amount for healthcare in 2016. Iowa is among the top 10 states in the nation for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund’s study. And health insurance costs are lower in Iowa this year than in more than half of the states, found GOBankingRates.

Kansas: More

About half of the Kansas residents surveyed said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. Kansas ranks in the top half of states for affordability and accessibility for healthcare, however, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Healthcare spending in Kansas has been below the national average in recent years, with households spending an average of $6,058 in 2014, according to the BEA. And health insurance costs in the state are among the lowest in the nation this year, according to GOBankingRates’ ranking.

Kentucky: More

About 46 percent of Kentuckians surveyed said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. More than one-third expect to pay the same as last year.

The average household spending on healthcare in the Bluegrass State was $5,852 in 2014, which was below the national average, according to the BEA. Insurance costs in the state this year fall in the middle of all of the states in GOBankingRates’ ranking.

Louisiana: More

About half of Louisiana residents polled said they expect to a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. Health insurance costs this year are relatively low compared with other states, found GOBankingRates. However, Louisiana ranks in the bottom half of states for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Maine: Same

The top response among Maine residents who were asked how much they expect to spend on healthcare in 2016 was “same as the last year.” The state ranks among the top 20 states for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund. And its insurance costs are lower than about half of the states, as ranked in GOBankingRates’ study.

Maryland: More

About half of Maryland residents said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in the coming year. The state had the lowest percentage of adults who had high out-of-pocket medical spending relative to their income in 2013 and 2014, according to the Commonwealth Fund. However, health insurance costs in Maryland this year are higher than more than half the states in GOBankingRates’ health insurance cost study.

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Massachusetts: More

Just a slightly higher percentage of Massachusetts residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016 than those who expect to pay the same as last year. The state ranks No. 1 for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Healthcare spending in Massachusetts was well above the national average in 2014, with households spending an average of $8,857 that year, according to the BEA. This year, however, GOBankingRates found that health insurance costs are lower in Massachusetts than in more than half of the states.

Michigan: More

Almost half of Michigan’s residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. However, insurance costs in Michigan are among the lowest in the nation this year, according to GOBankingRates’ study.

In previous years, household spending on healthcare has been just slightly above the national average. On average, households spent $6,371 in 2014, according to the BEA.

Minnesota: More

About half of Minnesota residents said they expect to spend a little or a lot more for healthcare in the coming year. It’s one of the top three states in the nation for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund. And health insurance costs in 2016 are lower in Minnesota than in more than half of the states.

Mississippi: More

In a state that has some of the highest insurance costs in the nation, as ranked by GOBankingRates, more than half of Mississippi’s residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016.

Mississippi ranks near the bottom of states for healthcare affordability and accessibility, and its healthcare system is the worst of any state, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Missouri: More

A greater percentage of Missouri residents surveyed said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016 than those who expect to pay the same or less. Health insurance costs in the state are among the highest in the nation, found GOBankingRates. And healthcare spending in the state has been higher than the national average in recent years, with households paying an average of $6,498 in 2014, according to the BEA.

Montana: More

A slightly higher percentage of Montana residents said they expect to spend a little or a lot more on healthcare in 2016 than those who expect to pay the same. Perhaps it’s because health insurance costs are relatively high in 2016 compared with costs in other states. Montana also ranks among the bottom half of states for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Nebraska: More

Nebraska ranks 23rd in the nation for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund. However, health insurance costs in the state will be higher than in most states this year, found GOBankingRates. Perhaps that’s why 44 percent of residents surveyed said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016 versus 31 percent who expect to pay the same.

Nevada: Same

Nevada ranks near the bottom in the nation for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund. Yet the majority of the residents surveyed by GOBankingRates said they expect to pay the same for healthcare as last year.

In the past, healthcare spending in Nevada has been among the lowest in the nation, with households spending an average of $4,935 for medical costs in 2014, according to the BEA.

New Hampshire: More

GOBankingRates’ survey found that New Hampshire residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. In the past, healthcare spending in the state has been higher than the national average, with households paying an average of $7,375 for medical costs in 2014, according to the BEA. However, New Hampshire ranks among the top 10 states for affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

New Jersey: More

Almost half of New Jersey residents who were surveyed said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. The state’s health insurance costs are among the highest in the nation, falling among the top five most expensive in GOBankingRates’ ranking.

However, healthcare spending hasn’t been much higher than the national average in recent years. Households spent an average of $6,459 on healthcare in 2014, according to the BEA.

New Mexico: More

In the state with the lowest health insurance costs in the nation, as ranked by GOBankingRates, more than half of state’s residents included in this survey said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. Despite low insurance costs, New Mexico has among the highest uninsured rates in the nation, according to the Commonwealth Fund. And it ranks among the worst states for healthcare affordability and accessibility.

New York: More

About 40 percent of New Yorkers surveyed said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016 versus about 35 percent who expect to pay the same. The state took the No. 1 spot for the highest insurance costs in the nation this year in GOBankingRates’ ranking.

In the past, healthcare spending in New York has topped the national average. Households paid $7,385, on average, for medical costs in 2014 according to the BEA.

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North Carolina: More

Nearly half of North Carolina residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. Health insurance costs this year are relatively high compared with other states. And North Carolina ranks among the bottom half of states for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

North Dakota: More

More than half of this state’s residents surveyed said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in the next year. North Dakota ranks 25th in the nation for health insurance costs in GOBankingRates’ 2016 study. And the state ranks 25th for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Ohio: More

Although 44 percent of the state’s residents surveyed expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016, 35 percent expect to pay the same. Health insurances costs in 2016 are higher in Ohio than in more than half of the states. However, the state ranks relatively high for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Oklahoma: More

About half of the state’s residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016, followed by about 30 percent who expect to pay less. Health insurance costs are among the highest in the nation this year in Oklahoma, as ranked by GOBankingRates. The state also ranks among the worst in the nation for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Oregon: More

About half of the state’s residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. Oregon ranks among the bottom half of states for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund. However, health insurance costs in the state this year are among the lowest in the nation, found GOBankingRates.

Pennsylvania: More

About 44 percent of Pennsylvania residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016, followed by 36 percent who expect to pay the same. Health insurance costs this year are among the lowest in the nation, with the state taking the No. 5 spot among the most affordable for health insurance in GOBankingRates’ ranking. The state ranks 12th in the nation for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Rhode Island: More

Only a slightly higher number of Rhode Island residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016 than those who expect to pay the same. Health insurance costs in Rhode Island are higher this year than in more than half of the states.

The state is fourth in the nation for healthcare accessibility and affordability, however, according to the Commonwealth Fund. Average household spending on healthcare in the state was $7,160 in 2014, according to the BEA.

South Carolina: More

Slightly more residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016 than those who expect to pay the same. Health insurance costs in South Carolina are the second-highest in the nation this year, found GOBankingRates. And the state ranks low for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

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South Dakota: More

More than half of the state’s residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. Health insurance costs in South Dakota are higher than more than half of the states this year.

These expectations are consistent with the state’s healthcare costs in recent years, which have been above the national average. Households spent an average of $7,135 on healthcare in 2014, according to the BEA.

Tennessee: More

About 45 percent of Tennessee’s residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016 versus about 31 percent who expect to pay the same. Health insurance costs in Tennessee are among the highest in the nation this year, as ranked by GOBankingRates. Moreoever, the state ranks among the bottom half of states for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Texas: More

About 45 percent of Texas residents surveyed expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016, whereas 34 percent expect to pay the same as last year. Health insurance costs in Texas are among the five most affordable states in the nation in GOBankingRates’ ranking.

The state has the highest rate of uninsured adults in the nation, however, according to the Commonwealth Fund. As a result, it’s the worst state for healthcare affordability and accessibility.

Utah: Same

Slightly more residents said they expect to pay the same for healthcare than those who said they expect to pay more in 2016. Health insurance costs in Utah are the second-lowest in the nation, found GOBankingRates’ 2016 study. In 2014, Utah’s healthcare spending per capita was the lowest in the nation, with average household spending on medical costs at $4,498, according to the BEA.

Vermont: More

Slightly more residents of Vermont said they expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016 than those who expect to pay the same as last year. Health insurance costs in the state are higher than more than half the states this year. However, Vermont ranks second in the nation for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Virginia: Same

Slightly more residents said they expect to pay the same for healthcare than those who said they expect to pay more in 2016. Virginia is in the No. 19 spot in both GOBankingRates’ ranking of state health insurance costs and the Commonwealth Fund’s ranking of healthcare affordability and accessibility.

In the past, healthcare spending in the state has fallen below the national average. Households paid $5,519, on average, for medical costs in 2014, according to the BEA.

Washington: More

A slightly higher percentage of Washington residents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016 than those who expect to pay the same. Health insurance costs in Washington are higher than in half of the other states this year, which is consistent with above-average healthcare spending in recent years. Households paid an average of $6,489 for medical costs in 2014, according to the BEA.

West Virginia: Same

Nearly half of the West Virginia residents who were surveyed said they expect to pay the same for healthcare as last year. In the past, West Virginia’s healthcare spending per capita has been higher than the national average. Households spent $6,825, on average, in 2014, according to the BEA.

Wisconsin: More

More than half of the Wisconsin residents surveyed expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. However, health insurance costs in the state are lower this year than in most states, as ranked by GOBankingRates. And Wisconsin ranks highly for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Wyoming: More

More than half of the Wyoming survey respondents expect to pay a little or a lot more for healthcare in 2016. Health insurance costs in Wyoming are among the 10 highest in the nation, found GOBankingRates’ 2016 study. The state also ranks among the bottom half of states for healthcare affordability and accessibility, according to the Commonwealth Fund.

Full List of Healthcare Cost Expectations in Every State and DC

Here is a complete list of the most popular response in each state to the question, “How much do you expect to pay for healthcare in the next year?” In states where the combined number of respondents who said they expect to pay a little more or a lot more outnumbered the number of respondents who said they expect to pay the same, the top response is listed below as “increase in 2016.”

State Residents’ Health Cost Expectations
Alabama Stay the same
Alaska Increase in 2016
Arizona Increase in 2016
Arkansas Increase in 2016
California Stay the same
Colorado Increase in 2016
Connecticut Increase in 2016
Delaware Increase in 2016
District of Columbia Increase in 2016
Florida Increase in 2016
Georgia Increase in 2016
Hawaii Tie: Increase and decrease in 2016
Idaho Tie: Stay the same and increase in 2016
Illinois Increase in 2016
Indiana Increase in 2016
Iowa Stay the same
Kansas Increase in 2016
Kentucky Increase in 2016
Louisiana Increase in 2016
Maine Stay the same
Maryland Increase in 2016
Massachusetts Increase in 2016
Michigan Increase in 2016
Minnesota Increase in 2016
Mississippi Increase in 2016
Missouri Increase in 2016
Montana Increase in 2016
Nebraska Increase in 2016
Nevada Stay the same
New Hampshire Increase in 2016
New Jersey Increase in 2016
New Mexico Increase in 2016
New York Increase in 2016
North Carolina Increase in 2016
North Dakota Increase in 2016
Ohio Increase in 2016
Oklahoma Increase in 2016
Oregon Increase in 2016
Pennsylvania Increase in 2016
Rhode Island Increase in 2016
South Carolina Increase in 2016
South Dakota Increase in 2016
Tennessee Increase in 2016
Texas Increase in 2016
Utah Stay the same
Vermont Increase in 2016
Virginia Stay the same
Washington Increase in 2016
West Virginia Stay the same
Wisconsin Increase in 2016
Wyoming Increase in 2016

Methodology: This poll was conducted as a Google Consumer Survey that collected 5,118 responses from Dec. 23-29, 2015. This survey posed a single question: “How much do you expect to pay for healthcare in the next year? (insurance, prescriptions, doctor visits, etc.).” Respondents could choose from four options listed in the following order: (1) “less than the last year,” (2) “same as the last year,” (3) “a little more than the last year” or (4) “a lot more than the last year.” The survey has a margin of error of 2.7 percent. Analyses by age, state and gender are based only on responses for which the respondents’ relevant demographic information was available.

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