Here’s When Your State Will Increase Online Sales Taxes

The South Dakota v. Wayfair tax starts Oct. 1 in 10 states.

On June 21, the Supreme Court ruled that states can require consumers to pay sales tax for all purchases made online. The South Dakota v. Wayfair decision overturned the 1992 Quill Corp. v. North Dakota ruling that barred states from forcing online and other remote retailers to charge sales tax unless the company had a physical presence in the state.

Some states have already instituted this new policy and several that haven’t are about to start. Keep reading to find out if and when your state will start taxing all online purchases, effectively taking more money out of your wallet.

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Here’s a quick look at how and when online sales tax is or will be charged for each state, and how much revenue states expect to make:

Online Sales Tax by State
State Compliance Date Estimate of State and Local Potential Revenue Gains*****
Alabama Oct. 1, 2018*** $156 million to $238 million
Alaska No sales tax N/A
Arizona TBD*** $190 million to $293 million
Arkansas TBD** $123 million to $169 million
California TBD*** $1 billion to $1.7 billion
Colorado July 1, 2018 (notice law)**** $168 million to $262 million
Connecticut Dec. 1, 2018*** $128 million to $194 million
Delaware No sales tax N/A
Washington, D.C. Pending*** $30 million to $44 million
Florida TBD*** $486 million to $758 million
Georgia Jan. 1, 2019* $232 million to $367 million
Hawaii July 1, 2018*** $36 million to $51 million
Idaho TBD*** $42 million to $60 million
Illinois Oct. 1, 2018*** $383 million to $626 million
Indiana Oct. 1, 2018* $168 million to $261 million
Iowa Jan. 1, 2019* $104 million to $146 million
Kansas TBD** $113 million to $170 million
Kentucky Oct. 1, 2018* $93 million to $140 million
Louisiana Jan. 1, 2019**** $195 million to $288 million
Maine July 1, 2018*** $28 million to $41 million
Maryland TBD*** $165 million to $252 million
Massachusetts In court*** $169 million to $279 million
Michigan Oct. 1, 2018** $221 million to $336 million
Minnesota Oct. 1, 2018* $132 million to $206 million
Mississippi Sept. 1, 2018*** $90 million to $123 million
Missouri TBD*** $180 million to $275 million
Montana No sales tax N/A
Nebraska Jan. 1, 2019** $67 million to $95 million
Nevada Pending** $87 million to $134 million
New Hampshire No sales tax N/A
New Jersey Oct. 1, 2018* $216 million to $351 million
New Mexico TBD*** $60 million to $88 million
New York TBD*** $510 million to $880 million
North Carolina Nov. 1, 2018** $223 million to $358 million
North Dakota Oct. 1, 2018* $34 million to $49 million
Ohio In court** $288 million to $456 million
Oklahoma July 1, 2018** $157 million to $228 million
Oregon No sales tax N/A
Pennsylvania In effect (pre-Wayfair) $219 million to $373 million
Rhode Island In effect (pre-Wayfair) $34 million to $48 million
South Carolina Pending*** $132 million to $193 million
South Dakota In court* $33 million to $47 million
Tennessee July 1, 2018*** $237 million to $363 million
Texas TBD*** $763 million to $1.2 billion
Utah Jan. 1, 2019* $73 million to $113 million
Vermont July 1, 2018* $16 million to $23 million
Virginia TBD*** $188 million to $298 million
Washington Oct. 1, 2018** $298 million to $453 million
West Virginia TBD** $53 million to $74 million
Wisconsin Oct. 1, 2018** $123 million to $187 million
Wyoming Pending* $22 million to $31 million

* State compliant with Wayfair checklist
**State can proceed with caution
***State should proceed only after making legislative changes
****Not compliant with Wayfair checklist
*****Based on 2017 data

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About the Author

Laura Woods

Laura is a writer with nearly 10 years of experience in marketing and personal finance. She is a Los Angeles-based writer specializing in personal finance, higher education, legal matters and marketing. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from the University of Pittsburgh and an MBA from Robert Morris University.

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