This Income Calculator Shows If You’re Actually in the Middle Class

See how big the middle class is in your state.
  • The American middle class stabilized in size and was better off in 2016 than it was in 2010, according to a Pew Research Center report.
  • But the median income for the middle class as of 2016 has remained stagnant since 2000.
  • The income gap between the middle and upper class is widening. Pew released a calculator you can use to compare your income to see whether you’re in the middle class.

The Pew Research Center has released a calculator that shows you if you fall in the lower, middle or upper class by comparing your information — such as state, metro area, pre-tax household income, size of household, education level, age, race and marital status — to government data as recent as 2016. You can compare yourself to your demographic or input a different state to dream of a life where money stretches further.

The Pew Research Center reports that the American middle class stabilized in size and was better off in 2016 than it was in 2010 — welcome news after decades worth of reports of the disappearance of the middle class. Despite that major gain, the median income for the middle class as of 2016 has remained stagnant since 2000. What’s less encouraging is that the income gap between the middle and upper class is widening.

Click to find out 10 reasons America’s middle class faces a bleak financial future.

Financially, Americans fall in three economic buckets: 52 percent of adults lived in middle-income households, 29 percent in lower-income households and 19 percent in upper-income households.

See: 16 Biggest Tax Questions for Single-Income Families

How Your Income Compares to the Middle Class in Every State

See where you stack up against other Americans in your metro area and state. The state-by-state table below is based on using Pew’s income calculator with the following metrics:

  • The largest metro area, which is often, but not always, the capital of every state
  • The national median household income as of 2016 according to the Census: $57,617
  • The average number of people in a household as of 2010 according to the Census: 3

Is It Time to Move? See These: 7 States With No Income Tax

Drilling into the data, wealth and cost-of-living disparities emerge. Connecticut’s largest metro area has the smallest percentage of middle income residents: 46 percent of Connecticut residents are in the tier associated with the national median income. On the other hand, 60 percent of people living in Honolulu are in the middle-class tier associated with the national median income.

Middle Class by State

StateLargest CityPercent of Adults in the Area Also in the Middle Income Tier
AlabamaBirmingham51
AlaskaAnchorage57
ArizonaPhoenix53
ArkansasLittle Rock54
CaliforniaLos Angeles47
ColoradoDenver55
ConnecticutBridgeport46
DelawareWilmington51
FloridaJacksonville55
GeorgiaAtlanta53
HawaiiHonolulu60
IdahoBoise56
IllinoisChicago51
IndianaIndianapolis54
IowaDes Moines58
KansasWichita58
KentuckyLouisville55
LouisianaNew Orleans49
MainePortland54
MarylandBaltimore52
MassachusettsBoston50
MichiganDetroit52
MinnesotaMinneapolis55
MississippiJackson 51
MissouriKansas City56
MontanaBillings56
NebraskaOmaha56
NevadaLas Vegas55
New HampshireManchester59
New JerseyNewark48
New MexicoAlbuquerque52
New YorkNew York City48
North CarolinaCharlotte54
North DakotaFargo55
OhioColumbus53
OklahomaOklahoma City52
OregonPortland55
PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia51
Rhode IslandProvidence53
South CarolinaColumbia55
South DakotaSioux Falls58
TennesseeMemphis52
TexasHouston48
UtahSalt Lake City59
VermontBurlington55
VirginiaVirginia Beach57
WashingtonSeattle53
West Virginia Charleston51
WisconsinMilwaukee54
WyomingCheyenne57

To find out if you’re in the American middle class, enter your information in the Pew Research Center’s income calculator.

Click to read about 31 cities where you can afford to live off less than $50,000.

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