Burger King Unveils New Reusable Packaging

Dayton, Ohio, USA - May 29, 2016: The newest Burger King "20/20" restaurant design with a sleek, contemporary, futuristic industrial-look theme includes brick cladding, manicured landscaping and a covered drive-thru order point with digital order screens.
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In a whopper of a move toward sustainability, Burger King announced reusable “zero-waste” packaging. The containers will be used for its burgers/sandwiches, as well as for beverages. Burger King’s pilot program is set to debut in New York City; Portland, Oregon; and Tokyo in 2021, with ambitions to roll out in more locations. The program is being launched in partnership with Loop, a packaging service. 

To opt into the program, customers will pay a deposit and then be refunded the money once they return the containers. The containers will then be sanitized so they can be reused. Though some consumers might see this optional program as a hassle, it’s sure to lure eco-conscious consumers who have been enjoying the fast food giant’s foray into plant-based meats in the form of the Impossible Whopper. Additionally, Burger King has 18,000-plus locations in the U.S.  That adds up to a lot of wasted packaging bringing harm to the environment

Burger King has every intention of taking its sustainability innovation in reusable packaging to the max. The company has said that it would supply 100% of its packaging from “renewable, recycled or certified sources” and recycle all that’s used in the U.S. by 2025.

If this interests you, keep in mind other ways to be environmentally friendly.

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About the Author

Nicole Spector is a writer, editor, and author based in Los Angeles by way of Brooklyn. Her work has appeared in Vogue, the Atlantic, Vice, and The New Yorker. She’s a frequent contributor to NBC News and Publishers Weekly. Her 2013 debut novel, “Fifty Shades of Dorian Gray” received laudatory blurbs from the likes of Fred Armisen and Ken Kalfus, and was published in the US, UK, France, and Russia — though nobody knows whatever happened with the Russian edition! She has an affinity for Twitter.