Do You Share Your Netflix Password? You May Soon Be Charged Extra

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Netflix is cracking down on password sharing, a practice that has cost the company about $9 billion worldwide, according to a company announcement on March 16. 

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“We’ve always made it easy for people who live together to share their Netflix account, with features like separate profiles and multiple streams in our Standard and Premium plans,” said Netflix director of product innovation Chengyi Long. 

“While these have been hugely popular, they have also created some confusion about when and how Netflix can be shared. As a result, accounts are being shared between households — impacting our ability to invest in great new TV and films for our members,” she added.

BGR noted that this announcement also comes at a time when new subscriber sign-ups have slowed down for the streaming service.

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“So for the last year, we’ve been working on ways to enable members who share outside their household to do so easily and securely, while also paying a bit more,” says Long.

Netflix plans to launch and test new features for members in Chile, Costa Rica and Peru over the next few weeks. Members on the Standard and Premium plans will be able to add up to two sub-accounts for people who live outside of the household. Each sub-account will have its own profile, personalized recommendations, login and password at a lower price.

The second feature allows members on the Basic, Standard and Premium plans who share their account to transfer profile information either to a new account or a sub-account.

Pricing for the new plans will be 2,380 CLP in Chile, 2.99 USD in Costa Rica, and 7.9 PEN in Peru.

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BGR says that while you technically can share your Netflix password with people who don’t live with you, it’s against the company’s terms of service. 

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Josephine Nesbit is a freelance writer specializing in real estate and personal finance. She grew up in New England but is now based out of Ohio where she attended The Ohio State University and lives with her two toddlers and fiancé. Her work has appeared in print and online publications such as Fox Business and Scotsman Guide.
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