MotorTrend Reveals the Car of the Year

2021 Mercedes-Benz E 350 Sedan
DaimlerAG - Global Communication / Mercedes-Benz

The Mercedes-Benz E-Class has been named the 2021 MotorTrend Car of the Year, the magazine announced on Monday. The luxury automobile, which starts at $55,300, dazzled critics with its snazzy convertible style, hi-tech designs and robust horsepower. 

MotorTrend was also taken with the E-Class’s advanced safety features. The model sports driver assistance technology includes automatic braking, enabling the car to stop for other vehicles as well as for pedestrians when the driver is turning — a standout feature that most other vehicles in this price range don’t offer. The only E-Class technology that failed to wow MotorTrend staffers was the user interface system for drivers and passengers, which was found to potentially distract the driver’s attention from the road.  

The Mercedes E-Class win comes as a surprise because it’s not a new design, but rather a “mid-cycle refresh,” which is akin to an updated design in the auto industry.  It beat out the following automobiles: the BMW 8 Series Gran Coupe; the Hyundai Sonata; the Nissan Sentra; the Porsche Taycan, and another Mercedes model, the CLA-Class. MotorTrend named the Land Rover Defender its named SUV of the Year in October. The Truck of the Year announcement should be coming later this month.

Daimler AG, maker of the Mercedes-Benz, shares were up slightly following the news, hovering at $53.87 as of Monday afternoon. Car sales have been dramatically down during the pandemic, and the Mercedes E-Class has hardly been an exception, with Daimler AG -87.5% in Q3 2020 compared to last year.  

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About the Author

Nicole Spector is a writer, editor, and author based in Los Angeles by way of Brooklyn. Her work has appeared in Vogue, the Atlantic, Vice, and The New Yorker. She’s a frequent contributor to NBC News and Publishers Weekly. Her 2013 debut novel, “Fifty Shades of Dorian Gray” received laudatory blurbs from the likes of Fred Armisen and Ken Kalfus, and was published in the US, UK, France, and Russia — though nobody knows whatever happened with the Russian edition! She has an affinity for Twitter.