Is Your State Richer Than These Countries?

These high-earning states knock even wealthy countries out of the running. Find out how your state stacks up.

The United States is such a powerful economic force that 15 of the 31 largest economies in the world earn less than individual American states when considering gross domestic product (GDP). Based on a 2015 GDP ranking from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, this breakdown will show you how the highest-producing states stack up to some of the world's biggest economic powerhouses.

California vs. France
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California vs. France

Just shy of 40 million people call California home. With a GDP of nearly $2.5 trillion, only five countries on Earth have bigger economies than California: the United States, China, Japan, Germany and the U.K.

France, which has a GDP of $2.42 trillion, slid into seventh place in 2015 after struggling with a weak currency. Tech, tourism and a general expansion of economic output to Southern California fueled the Golden State's growth, which totaled 4.1 percent in the year ending in 2015.

See: The Cost of Living Across America

Texas vs. Canada
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Texas vs. Canada

Residents of the Lone Star State are fond of saying that everything is bigger in Texas — and that's almost true. A $1.58 trillion GDP earns Texas an economy larger than that of any other state except for California.

In fact, just nine countries across the world have bigger economies than Texas, which edges out America's Friendly Neighbor to the North, Canada, and its GDP of $1.55 trillion. Texas is also home to 109 of the 1,000 largest companies in the U.S., both public and private.

New York vs. South Korea
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New York vs. South Korea

The third-largest economy in the United States belongs to the Empire State — New York. If New York were a country, its $1.47 trillion GDP would make it the world's 11th largest economy, just ahead of the Republic of Korea, which tallied a GDP of just under $1.38 trillion in 2015.

The state's economy is dominated by New York City, which is America's hub of finance, advertising, banking, publishing and media. In fact, if the economically lopsided state were split in two, the upstate portion would have among the worst economic indicators in the country.

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Florida vs. Indonesia
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Florida vs. Indonesia

If Florida were a country, it would beat out Indonesia for the rank of the world's No. 16 economy. Indonesia had a GDP of just under $862 billion in 2015, compared to Florida's $902.2 billion.

Florida's economy is dominated by the trade, space, tourism and agriculture industries. 40 percent of everything the U.S. exports to South and Latin America passes through the Sunshine State.

Illinois vs. the Netherlands
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Illinois vs. the Netherlands

The $784.41 billion economy of the state of Illinois is more than $34 billion larger than that of the Netherlands, which was reported at $750.28 billion in 2015. That's enough for Illinois to rank as the world's No. 17 economy.

That status, however, might not last long. Illinois is in the midst of a serious economic crisis characterized by outward migration, a downgraded bond rating, political gridlock and imbalanced budgets.

Pennsylvania vs. Switzerland
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Pennsylvania vs. Switzerland

With a GDP of nearly $695.9 billion, Pennsylvania's economy is so large that it beats out even oil-rich Saudi Arabia and, more closely, Switzerland. With a GDP of less than $670.8 billion, the Swiss economy loses the world's No. 19 spot to Pennsylvania by about $25 billion.

Pennsylvania's key industries include natural gas, agribusiness and manufacturing. Tourism, life sciences and plastics are also major contributors.

Ohio vs. Argentina
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Ohio vs. Argentina

If Ohio were a country, it would edge out Argentina as the No. 21 largest economy in the world. With a GDP of $616.4 billion, it's got a leg up on that of the enormous South American nation, which had a GDP of $583.2 in 2015.

Top industries in Ohio include manufacturing, agriculture, aviation and aerospace, motor vehicle parts and manufacturing. According to Forbes, the state has enjoyed a radical positive economic turnaround from a slump it suffered several years ago.

New Jersey vs. Sweden
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New Jersey vs. Sweden

New Jersey's $577.3 billion economy easily sweeps the Northeast state into the No. 22 spot for the largest economies in the world. Sweden, with a GDP of $495.62 billion, loses its place on the list by more than $80 billion.

New Jersey borders the major metropolitan economies of both New York City and Philadelphia. Among New Jersey's key industries are pharmaceuticals, transportation, finance and healthcare.

Related: Sweden and 33 Other Countries That Pay Less for Healthcare Than Americans

North Carolina vs. Nigeria
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North Carolina vs. Nigeria

With a GDP of $481.07 billion, Nigeria is home to the world's No. 23 largest economy, but that's only because North Carolina isn't a country. If it were, the state's $508.24 billion GDP would easily earn the title.

North Carolina is home to the country's largest textile mill industry, which includes Hanes, as well a major plastics and chemicals industry. The state is also buoyed by a muscular aerospace and defense industry.

Georgia vs. Poland
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Georgia vs. Poland

With a GDP of just under $505.2 billion, Georgia could wrestle the No. 24 spot from Poland, a country with a GDP that measures just under $477.07. And, it's one of the cheapest countries to live in.

Georgia's key industries include data centers, energy and environment, information technology and automotive. The state is also home to the busiest airport in the world.

Virginia vs. Belgium
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Virginia vs. Belgium

Virginia's GDP comes in just under $489 billion. That's enough to edge out Belgium, and the European nation's $455.1 billion GDP, for the title of the world's No. 25 largest economy.

Among the key industries driving Virginia's economic engine are food processing, aerospace and data centers. The plastics, life science and automotive sectors also play a major part in Virginia's economy.

See More: Best and Worst States to Retire Rich

Massachusetts vs. Iran
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Massachusetts vs. Iran

With a GDP of $425.3 billion, the Islamic Republic of Iran boasts the 26th-largest economy in the world — but that's only because Massachusetts is a state, not a country. If it were, its $481.63 billion GDP would be enough to take that title from the Persian nation — with more than $55 billion to spare.

Life sciences, finance and IT dominate the Massachusetts economy. The renewable energy, defense, manufacturing, maritime and creative sectors also contribute heavily.

Michigan vs. Thailand
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Michigan vs. Thailand

Michigan's nearly $474.7 billion economy crushes Thailand's $330.78 billion GDP by more than $140 billion. That's more than enough for the Great Lake State to secure the world's No. 27 spot on the list of the planet's largest economies.

Michigan's core sector is the automotive industry. IT, defense, aerospace, cybersecurity and agribusiness also play major roles in the state's economy.

Washington vs. Norway
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Washington vs. Norway

In the battle for the No. 28 spot on the list of the world's biggest economies, the heart of the Great Northwest handily beats the Nordic nation of Norway. Norway has a GDP of $386.57 billion, compared to Washington state, which boasts a GDP of $450.58 billion.

Washington's economy is driven by several key industries, including the military, aerospace, maritime, life science and global health. The IT, forestry, clean energy, and agriculture sectors also play a major role.

Maryland vs. Egypt
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Maryland vs. Egypt

Currently, the world's No. 31 largest economy is maintained by Egypt, home to one of the planet's first major civilizations. If states were countries, however, Maryland's $368.4 billion GDP would knock Egypt — which has a GDP of just under $330.78 billion — out of the running.

The aerospace and defense industry plays a major role in Maryland's economy. The manufacturing, biohealth and life sciences, IT and energy sectors also drive the state's GDP.

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