52% of Gen Z and Millennial Employees Willing to Change Jobs This Year

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The Great Resignation — or The Great Reshuffle, as some call it — is far from over. It’s no secret that the pandemic has reshaped perceptions of what constitutes work and the workplace. A desire for more flexibility, prioritizing well-being and family, as well as remote or hybrid work, are all factors that have contributed to a changing employment landscape. Now, a new survey finds that more than half of Gen Z and millennial employees say they may change jobs this year.

See: You Don’t Need a 4-Year Degree To Land These 10 Remote Jobs
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The new “Microsoft 2022 Work Trend Index,” released March 16, suggests that 43% of employees are somewhat or extremely likely to consider changing jobs in the coming year, up slightly year-over-year from 41% of those polled. Members of certain generations are even more likely to consider changing employers, as 52% of Gen Z and millennial respondents combined may change jobs in the year ahead, up 3% since last year.

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By comparison, only 35% of Gen X and boomers polled say they’re considering a job change, the survey notes.

“One thing is clear: We’re not the same people that went home to work in early 2020. The collective experience of the past two years has left a lasting imprint, fundamentally changing how we define the role of work in our lives,” the survey notes. “Employees everywhere are rethinking their ‘worth it’ equation and are voting with their feet. And as more people experience the upsides of flexible work, the more heavily it factors into the equation. For Gen Z and millennials, there’s no going back. And with other generations not far behind, companies must meet employees where they are.”

Indeed, 58% of Gen Z are considering a shift to hybrid work in the year ahead (versus 53% of those polled overall) and 56% are considering a shift to remote work in the year ahead (versus 49% of respondents overall).

In addition, the survey finds that 70% of Gen Z — and 67% of millennial — workers say they are considering earning additional income via a side project or business outside their current employer in the next year.

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“For leaders, this is creating new challenges — not just in attracting and retaining top talent, but in engaging current employees who increasingly define and design their careers around creative pursuits,” the survey summary reads.

Learn: 6 Reasons Why Remote Jobs Have Location Requirements
Explore: 13 Career Fields Where the Number of Remote Jobs Is Growing Rapidly

Finally, the survey finds that Gen Z workers’ likelihood to engage with a company posting on LinkedIn if it mentions “flexibility” is far higher — 77% — than millennials (30%) and users belonging to other generations on the platform.

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About the Author

Yaël Bizouati-Kennedy is a full-time financial journalist and has written for several publications, including Dow Jones, The Financial Times Group, Bloomberg and Business Insider. She also worked as a vice president/senior content writer for major NYC-based financial companies, including New York Life and MSCI. Yaël is now freelancing and most recently, she co-authored  the book “Blockchain for Medical Research: Accelerating Trust in Healthcare,” with Dr. Sean Manion. (CRC Press, April 2020) She holds two master’s degrees, including one in Journalism from New York University and one in Russian Studies from Université Toulouse-Jean Jaurès, France.
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