Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Net Worth After 25 Years on the Supreme Court

The veteran Supreme Court justice has had an impressive career.

  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg suffered three fractured ribs after a fall on Wednesday, Nov. 7.
  • Ginsburg has served 25 years on the U.S. Supreme Court and amassed an estimated net worth of $4 million.
  • She’s the third-wealthiest member of the nation’s highest court.

After 25 years of serving on the Supreme Court, she’s earned the right to be identified simply by her initials: RBG. Adoring fans of Ruth Bader Ginsburg took to social media on Thursday, Nov. 8, to organize healing circles, jokingly offer rib donations and send well wishes after Ginsburg fractured three ribs in a fall in her office on Wednesday evening.

At 85 years old, Ginsburg is considered something of a rock star packaged in a 5-foot-tall, 100-pound frame. Heralded for being the second woman to serve on the Court, a two-time cancer survivor and an advocate of LGBTQ rights, younger generations have elevated the no-nonsense and liberal-leaning justice on a pedestal as a fitness influencer, sartorial muse and feminist icon. Here’s a look at her net worth and impressive career.

Birthdate: March, 15, 1933
Net worth: $4 million
Sources of income: Supreme Court Justice
Career highlights: Second woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court — appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1993

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Net Worth: $4M

Ginsburg’s net worth is reportedly around $4 million, according to 2016 financial disclosures by the justices.  She holds the distinction of being the oldest-serving and third-wealthiest member of the nation’s highest court after Stephen Breyer and John Roberts.

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As an associate justice, Ginsburg’s 2018 annual salary is an impressive $255,300, according to the U.S. Court. She’ll continue to bring home a quarter of a million dollars even after she hangs up her justice robe — her lifetime appointment financially translates to a guaranteed yearly salary that extends into retirement. Federal judges can retire and collect full yearly pay as long as they’re at least 65 years old and have served a set number of years in relation to the age they attained their position, according to the U.S. code.

Moreover, each justice stands to outearn their salary with lucrative book deals, teaching appointments and guest speaking engagements.

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg Personal Life

The Brooklyn, N.Y., native is a graduate of Cornell University and attended law school at Harvard before transferring and graduating from Columbia Law School. Before being called to the bench by President Bill Clinton in 1993, Ginsburg’s professional resume reflected a career dedicated to the law. She held law clerkships, taught law at both Rutgers and Columbia, and served as the ACLU’s General Counsel. Ginsburg balanced professional success with her 56-year marriage to Martin Ginsburg until his death in 2010. Together they have two children, Jane and James. During a speaking appearance in July, Ginsburg said she thought she had “at least five more years” to serve on the Supreme Court.

Read more about other powerful women in Washington, like Sen. Kamala Harris.

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