What Amazon’s Prime Day Deals Mean for Shoppers Everywhere

man using Walmart grocery delivery
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Amazon may be poised to steal the show in shopping this week with its Prime Day extravaganza, but other stores dove in on the action by serving up their own deals. The hope among the retail sector, which has been deeply impacted by the pandemic, specifically where “non-essential” products are concerned, is that Prime Day — typically held in July — will kick off holiday shopping in October.

Target hosted “Deal Days,” while Best Buy launched its Black Friday sales on the same days as Prime. GameStop, Nordstrom, Home Depot and Uniqlo also stepped into the savings spotlight during Amazon’s Prime time, with their own savings events. Walmart, who recently launched Walmart+ — in a clear bid to give Prime a run for its subscriber money — got a head start on Amazon by rolling out its “Big Save Event” Sunday through Thursday.

Prime Day is expected to rake in as much as $10 billion for Amazon, eMarketer forecasts, setting a very high bar for competing retailers. But any momentum around shopping right now is one that could benefit stores, even if Amazon is the company building the buzz. “Prime Day helps everybody who sells online,” Robby Ohmes, a discount retail analyst for Bank of America Securities, told CNBC. “It brings everybody to the table, and everyone does something special to try to participate in it.”

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About the Author

Nicole Spector is a writer, editor, and author based in Los Angeles by way of Brooklyn. Her work has appeared in Vogue, the Atlantic, Vice, and The New Yorker. She’s a frequent contributor to NBC News and Publishers Weekly. Her 2013 debut novel, “Fifty Shades of Dorian Gray” received laudatory blurbs from the likes of Fred Armisen and Ken Kalfus, and was published in the US, UK, France, and Russia — though nobody knows whatever happened with the Russian edition! She has an affinity for Twitter.