How To Set Up Bank of America Direct Deposit and Get Money Faster

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Direct deposit is a convenient way to receive money from your employer or the government. If you’re a Bank of America customer, you have another reason to consider setting up a direct deposit: It’s a way to avoid monthly maintenance fees on select accounts. Keep reading to learn more about how to sign up for Bank of America direct deposit and how it works.

What Is Direct Deposit?

Direct deposit is simply the electronic transfer of funds straight into your Bank of America bank account from the entity that is paying you, which might be your employer or a government agency. Direct deposit is faster and less expensive than issuing paper checks.

How To Set Up Direct Deposit With Bank of America

There are multiple ways to set up a Bank of America direct deposit. No matter which method you choose, you need to provide information about yourself and your account.

What Is Needed for Direct Deposit?

Here’s the information you need to set up a direct deposit:

  • Bank of America account number
  • Bank of America routing number
  • Employer’s name and address

How To Set Up a Direct Deposit From an Employer

To set up a direct deposit from your employer, follow these steps:

  1. Fill out a Non-Federal Direct Deposit Enrollment Request Form. You can find this form on Bank of America’s website.
  2. Alternatively, you can sign in to Online Banking and download a preprinted Bank of America direct deposit form. This form takes the place of a Bank of America voided check.
  3. Give the direct deposit form to your employer for processing.

How To Set Up a Direct Deposit From the U.S. Treasury

For benefits being paid by the federal government, such as Social Security and Veterans Affairs payments, you have three options. The first is to complete the process online:

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  1. Visit GoDirect.gov to set up direct deposit.
  2. Complete the online form.

You also can call the U.S. Treasury or schedule an appointment at a local Bank of America branch during regular business hours.

Bank of America Direct Deposit Frequently Asked Questions

Once you begin the process of setting up direct deposit at Bank of America, you’ll probably have some questions. Here are some common ones:

How Do I Know If My Direct Deposit Is Set Up With Bank of America?

You can keep an eye out for your first direct deposit by checking your account balance or by signing up for notifications from Bank of America that will text or email you when you receive a direct deposit into your checking account or savings account.

What Time Does Direct Deposit Go Through Bank of America?

Direct deposits can be set up for same-day, next-day or two-day processing. The money should be in your bank account by the opening of business the day you’re supposed to receive the direct deposit.

Does Bank of America Process Direct Deposits on the Weekend?

Bank of America does not process direct deposits on the weekend. Banking days are regular business days — Monday through Friday, except for federal bank holidays. At Bank of America, direct deposits post on the first available banking day.

How Long Does It Take for Direct Deposit To Start?

Starting and processing times for direct deposits can vary depending on factors such as who is issuing the payment. As long as the information you submit is correct, you should be able to receive direct deposits in three to seven days.

Does Bank of America Offer Early Direct Deposit?

No, Bank of America does not offer early direct deposit. Direct deposits post on the first available banking day.

Should You Set Up a Bank of America Direct Deposit?

If you are a Bank of America customer, it makes sense to set up a direct deposit for recurring payments. Not only is it a convenient way to receive money, but it can also bring you significant savings. For example, Advantage Plus Banking checking account holders can waive the $12 monthly maintenance fee when they have at least one qualifying direct deposit of $250 or more made to their accounts. That’s a savings of $144 per year.

This article has been updated with additional reporting since its original publication. This content is not provided by Bank of America. Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author alone and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by Bank of America.

About the Author

Karen Doyle is a personal finance writer with over 20 years’ experience writing about investments, money management and financial planning. Her work has appeared on numerous news and finance
websites including GOBankingRates, Yahoo! Finance, MSN, USA Today, CNBC, Equifax.com, and more.